Fountain Graffiti

Images of graffiti from the loyalist west bank. Two from Hawkin Street, including an incursion by republicans (“IRA”); one from Upper Bennett Street mocking the deaths on Bloody Sunday – “Para[s] 13, Provos 0”; and two from Bishop Street, Londonderry – “Kill All Taigs”, “W[est] B[ank] L[oyalists] – F[uck] T[he] P[rovos]”.

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Copyright © 2011 Peter Moloney

The Apprentice Angel

This Sculpture is about unlocking freedom, a community that does not know outward social freedom can still know inward personal freedom. The key to freedom is formed within the heart, each individual has an unseen key that can help a community unlock the knowledge of itself. The Apprentice Angel is a bringer of freedom, he is patterned with keys collected within The Fountain Estate by young people from The Cathedral Youth Club. The Angel holds a large recast key from the Siege of Derry 1689, a key in the hand of an Apprentice that helped turn history, the Past is always present but the Future is key to us all, we alone have the power to unlock it and the right to experience it. Within a community it is young hearts that beat loudest, it is their future that we must help unlock with the keys of Freedom. This was a Cathedral Youth Club project funded by Arts Council Re-Imaging Communities. Sculptor – Ross Wilson.”

The Fountain, Londonderry.

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Copyright © 2011 Peter Moloney

Vindicated/Ceartaithe

An Feachtas Um Cheartas Dhomhnach Na Fola/The Bloody Sunday Justice Campaign was founded in 1992 to press for a repudiation of the original (Widgery) Bloody Sunday inquiry and the reopening of the case (Museum Of Free Derry). That second (a.k.a. Saville) inquiry published its findings in June 2010, concluding that those killed and injured were innocent protesters, which led then-UK Prime Minister David Cameron to apologise (Museum Of Free Derry).

A march in search of justice for the Bloody Sunday victims has been held annually since 1973, taking the same route as in 1972 from from Creggan shops to Free Derry Corner; the annual march has continued.

The rear of Free Derry corner has its own Visual History page.

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Copyright © 2011 Peter Moloney

Changing Faces

“The Changing Faces artwork is a project that has been undertaken by a group of young people from Impact Training. They looked to their surrounding area where they explored and documented how it appears in 2010. What is the Shankill? What does it look like and what does it mean to youth culture now? Murals have been something that has been prevalent in the community for many years. Times change, opinions soften and people can begin to build a changing face.” On the left is a selection of details from murals with familiar subjects: King Billy, hooded gunmen, the red hand of Ulster, Carson, the Queen Mother; on the right are four panels on the theme of the red hand of Ulster in youth culture (clockwise from left): with wild-style writing from the Cupar Way “peace” line and soccer, with pop music, with It’s All Good by Dublin artist Maser, and with a (two-handed) warrior. “Don’t push away our culture … learn it and embrace it.”

For more on the attempt to put community art on the Cupar Way “peace” line, see Visual History 10.

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Copyright © 2011 Peter Moloney