Out Of The Ashes Of 1798

“I ndíl chuimhne – this plaque is dedicated to all those from the greater Newington area who lost their lives as a result of the conflict in this country.” Pikemen from the 1798 uprising flank a phoenix, with portraits above of Wolfe Tone, James Connolly, Henry Joy McCracken, and Mary Ann McCracken.

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Copyright © 2007 Peter Moloney

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Twinbrook Final Salute

Three generations of republicans, from the Troubles, the Rising, and the Rebellion, salute “F[rankie] Ryan, B[obby] Sands, J[ohn] Rooney, G[erard] Fennel, B[artholomew] Teeling”. The first four are modern IRA volunteers; the last is a United Irishman from Lisburn (Rebel Breeze has a full account of his deeds).

For an unspoiled view, see J0194.

Juniper Way, Twinbrook.

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney

South Armagh Óglaigh Na hÉireann

Here are three nail-ups from Newry Road, Crossmaglen. The first shows hooded IRA volunteers in front of Starry Plough and Sunburst flags on pikes (symbol of the 1798 Rebellion). The second shows crossed pikes and crossed rifles. The third calls for British Army bases to be demilitarised.

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney

Charlie Monahan

Charlie Monahan (Cathal Ó Monacháin/Ó Muineacháin) died along with Con Keating and Daniel Sheehan in a motor accident in Kerry, when their car was driven off a pier on the way to help guide Roger Casement (shown in the top left) land a ship full of weapons. “T’was on Good Friday morning before the break of day/A German ship was signaling way out there in the bay/With 20,000 rifles already for to land/But no answering signal did come from the lonely Banna Strand … And the wild wind sings their requiem on the lonely Banna Strand.” “This mural was sponsored by the Brehon Law Society USA.”

Mountpottinger Road, Belfast

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney

Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité

“Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité” was a slogan used during the French Revolution of 1789. The Society Of United Irishmen was inspired by both the American and French revolutions. It was founded in 1791 and planned to rebel when French troops arrived. 15,000 attempted to land unsuccessfully in 1796 and only a thousand were involved in 1798. South Link, Belfast

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Copyright © 2004 Peter Moloney

Óglaigh Na hÉireann 1803–2003

Robert Emmet was hanged on September 20th, 1803, after his unsuccessful rebellion. At trial, he predicted that the struggle for Irish independence would continue, in his parting speech: “When my country takes her place among the nations of the earth, then and not till then, let my epitaph be written.” There is no direct link between the Irishmen and an army of the Irish Republic – after the execution of Emmet and Thomas Russell, the Society Of United Irishmen collapsed. The Maid Of Erin harp is the symbol of the Society.

Bingnian Road, Belfast

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Copyright © 2004 Peter Moloney

Éire Nua

“Éire Nua” was the Provisional Sinn Féin and (after the split) Republican Sinn Féin (RSF) plan for a federal Ireland, with a semi-independent Ulster parliament. The board above combines various iconic images: Divis tower, Cave Hill, Free Derry Corner, the female volunteer in beretthe revolutionary in front of the Tricolour on a pike.

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Copyright © 2003 Peter Moloney

They May Kill The Revolutionary

“They may kill the revolutionary but not the revolution.” The imagery of the open-throated volunteers goes back to a 1981 poster. The 11 portraits are perhaps those of the people listed on the roll of honour at Constance Markievicz House, a short distance away: Martin Skillen, Gerard Fennell, Sean McDermott, Paul Best, Pearse Jordan, Terence O’Neill, John Dempsey, Martin Forsythe, Tom Magill, Sean Savage. Kevin McCracken. Norglen Parade, Belfast.

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Copyright © 2002, 2004 Peter Moloney