Out Of The Ashes Of 1798

“I ndíl chuimhne – this plaque is dedicated to all those from the greater Newington area who lost their lives as a result of the conflict in this country.” Pikemen from the 1798 uprising flank a phoenix, with portraits above of Wolfe Tone, James Connolly, Henry Joy McCracken, and Mary Ann McCracken.

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Copyright © 2007 Peter Moloney

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The Patriot Keeps Marching On

“In proud and loving memory of Tyrone’s republican dead. “A Patriot: The glamour of the battle calls to boyhood/The martial music trills the youthful heart/And lads go out and give their all for freedom/content to know that they have done their part//But when the first proud wave of glory passes/And nought is left but duty stark and clear/When no pipes skirl and drums have ceased their beating/And the way to freedom stretches dark and drear//’Ttis then we know the Patriot from the Soldier/The Patriot keeps marching, marching on” – Henry O’Kane [?Colonel Henry O’Kane, interpreter for the French Army in 1798?] Suaimhneas dá n-anamacha ar dheis laimh Dé ins na flaithis. | Gó ndéana Muire, banríon na nGael, idirghuí ar a son. Erected by Tyrone National Graves Association.” Mullanmore Road, Carrickmore.

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Copyright © 2007 Peter Moloney

Crowley – Carty – Loughran

“I ndíl chuimhne. In proud and loving memory of Óglach Dermot Crowley, Óglach Patrick Carty, Óglach Sean Loughran, Tyrone Brigade Óglaidh Na hÉireann who died on active service outside Omagh 25th June 1973. Fuair siad bás ar son shaoirse na hÉireann. ‘If you strike at, or imprison, or killus, out of our prisons or graves we will still evoke a spirit that will thwart you, and perhaps, raise a force that will destroy you! We defy you! Do your worst’ – James Connolly.” The three died from a premature bomb explosion. For brief biographies, see An Phoblacht.

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Copyright © 2007 Peter Moloney

South Armagh Roll Of Honour

These three images are from the electricity pole at the edge of the graveyard on Newry Road, Crossmaglen. First is a south Armagh IRA roll of honour, listing 20 volunteers’ names: McVerry, Boyle, Jordan, Campbell, Lochrie, McKiernan, Cleary, Harvey, McElvenna, Caherty, McCreesh, Moley, Caraher (Fergal and Francie), Duffy, Martin, Daly, Watters, Toner, and Rogers.

Second, on the back of the poles, “Caution – radiation area” refers to anomalies in animal births, allegedly due to radiation from British Army towers (An PhoblachtDaily Ireland). There’s also a flyer protesting “political policing – democracy under attack”.

Finally, a Calor gas is modified with republican graffiti: “Built by robots, flown by dummies, taken out by 2nd Batt. barrack-busters.” The incident celebrated is a 1994 IRA mortar attack on a British Army helicopter at the Crossmaglen barracks (CAIN | WP page on the incident). The mortar used a Calor Gas tube, though not the one shown here (WP page on the mortar).

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney

The Five Demands, 2006

A very different ‘Five Demands’ from Sinn Féin on the 25th anniversary of the hunger strike: “1. The Irish Government should produce a Green Paper on Irish Unity. 2. The work of the All Ireland Ministerial Council should be expanded and additional All Ireland Implementation Bodies created. Westminster MP’s elected in the 6 Counties should be accorded speaking rights in the Dail [sic]. 3. Voting rights for Presidential elections should be extended to citizens in the six counties. 5 The Irish Government should actively engage with the British Government and Unionism to promote and seek support for re-unification.”

The original ‘Five Demands’ are given as “1. The right to wear our own clothes. 2 The right to refrain from prison work. 3. The right to free association with fellow prisoners. 4. The right to organise recreation and leisure activity – with one letter, parcel and visit allowed per week. 5. To have remission lost, as a result of the blanket protest, restored.” For versions of the five demands from the period, see one | two | three.

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney

Keep On Marching

“Keep on marching, don’t give up – Raymond McCreesh 1957-81. Died after 61 days hunger-strike, H-Block Long Kesh 1981.” The phrase was spoken at the end of a visit with Jim Gibney. “Beidh bua againn go fóill” [victory will be ours yet]. The mural is on the Quarter Road gable of “Raymond McCreesh House (his birthplace), at Maryville Camlough.

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney

Óglach Réamann Mac Raois

“Déanann Poblachtánaigh An Iúir cuimhne ar an óglach Réamann Mac Raois.” [Newry republicans remember volunteer Raymond McCreesh]

IRA volunteer Raymond McCreesh – born in Camlough – was arrested in the aftermath of an attack on a British Army observation post in 1976. He joined the blanket protest and then the hunger strike; he died after 61 days on May 21st, 1981.

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Copyright © 2006 Peter Moloney