King William At The Boyne

William III, Prince of Orange, leads his men across the Boyne while the Duke Of Schomberg, second in command, (or perhaps the opposing King James II) dies on the river bank. Schomberg’s death is shown in this 1778 painting by Benjamin West.

Shankill Parade, Belfast.

M02475

Copyright © 2005 Peter Moloney

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The 300th Anniversary Of The Battle Of The Boyne

The King William III Prince of Orange mural is repainted and to it are added the UYM emblem and a set of flags of England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. Most significantly, however, the modern-day gunman on the right has been replaced by another Williamite soldier. Seen previously in 1990 | 1991.

Blythe Street, Belfast

M02403 M02400 M02401

Copyright © 2005 Peter Moloney

The City Is Saved

“In Londonderry on 7 December 1688 thirteen Apprentice Boys seized the initiative, closed the gates of the city and refused admittance to the Jacobite troops. This event is annually commemorated in Londonderry by the Apprentice Boys of Derry. The siege of the City did not actually begin until 18 April 1689,when James II appeared in person at Bishop’s Gate and was refused admittance. The City’s defenders greeted James with cries of ‘No surrender!’ and fired shots at him. The Jacobites were incapable of mounting an effective siege, thus, the Jacobites sought to starve the city into submission. The defenders too had to cope with severe problems. Some 37,000 people were trapped in a city whose normal population was approximately 2,000. The hard-pressed defenders were reduced to eating rats, mice and dogs fattened on human corpses. Some 15,000 people died of dysentery and malnutrition. On the 28th July 1689 three Williamite ships managed to break the boom on the Foyle and relieve the city.”

Third in a series of panels on Thorndyke Street, Belfast.

M02300 M03634 [X00024] [X00025]

Copyright © 2005, 2007 Peter Moloney