Neamhcromtha, Neamhbhriste!

“Unbowed, unbroken.” Five of the original 18 portraits are missing – see the image from 2006 (as well as the plaque just out of shot to the left.)

This is a version of the earlier Éire/Ireland mural (depicted as a female in the centre of the mural) seen in 2005.

Mountpottinger Road, Belfast.

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

Understand The Past

“Understand the past – and build a better future le chéile Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter.” “The past” in this case is the Battle Of St Matthew’s (“Chath Naomh Máitiú”), one of the formative events of the Provisional IRA (“Óglaigh na hÉireann”) (WP). The “better future” is symbolised by the dove and the absence of a weapon in the arms of the central figures – compare to this Derry mural from 1985. The mural was unveiled as part of the commemorative events to mark the 40th anniversary of the Battle.

Mountpottinger Street, Belfast.

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

Building An Ireland Of Equals

“Ag aontú Caitliceach, Protastúnach agus Easaontóirí.” – “Uniting Catholic, Protestant, and Dissenter.” In An Argument On Behalf Of The Catholics Of Ireland (1791), Wolfe Tone of the United Irishmen wrote, “To subvert the tyranny of our execrable government, to break the connection with England, the never-failing source of all our political evils, and to assert the independence of my country, these were my objects. To unite the whole people of Ireland, to abolish the memory of past dissensions, and to substitute the common name of Irishman, in place of the denominations of Protestant, Catholic and Dissenter, these were my means.”
With portraits of Bobby Sands, Wolfe Tone, and in the centre, Winifred Carney.

 

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Copyright © 2009 Peter Moloney

Fianna Éireann 1909-2009

“Fuair siad bás ar son saoirse na hÉireann” [they died for the freedom of Ireland]. Na Fianna Éireann [warriors of Ireland; IRA youth] were begun in 1909 by Countess Markievicz and Belfast man Bulmer Hobson (WP). They took part in the Easter Rising of 1916. The role of honour lists deaths from 1969 to 1984 – the Troubles. After the Agreement, the Fianna are affiliated with Republican Sinn Féin and the Continuity IRA. At the corner of Beechmount Avenue and the Falls Road – see the Visual History of this wall.

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Copyright © 1985 Peter Moloney

Sean Mac Diarmada

“Sean Mac Diarmada 1883-1916 a bhí ina chónaí i Sráid de Buitléir sa bhiain 1905.” [who was living in Butler Street in the year 1905]. Seán MacDiarmada was born in Leitrim, left for Glasgow at age 15, but after two years returned to Belfast in 1905 (working on the trams) and – according to the new mural above – spoke from the back of a coal lorry in Clonard Street, outside the Clonard branch of the Ancient Order Of Hibernians. MacDiarmada was for a short time an AOH member, before moving on to the Irish Republican Brotherhood and Irish Volunteers, which led to his participation in the 1916 Easter Rising and execution on May 12th of that year. Havana Way, Belfast.

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Copyright © 2009 Peter Moloney

Stailc Ocrais

Twelve hunger strikers prior to the 1981 strike are included in this Shaws Road board: on the left: Thomas Ashe, Mountjoy 1917; Michael Fitzgerald, Cork 1920; Terence McSwiney, Brixton 1920; Joseph Murphy, Cork 1920; Joseph Witty, Curragh 1923; Denis Barry, Newbridge 1923; Andrew Sullivan, Newbridge 1923; Tony D’Arcy, Arbour Hill 1940; Jack McNeela, Arbour Hill 1940; Seán McCaughey, Portlaoise 1946; Michael Gaughan, Parkhurst 1974; plus on the right: Frank Stagg, Wakefield 1976.

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Copyright © 2008 Peter Moloney