Those From St Mary’s Parish

“I ndíl chuimhne orthu siúd ó pharóiste N. Muire a thug a riabh [raibh] acu ar son saoirse na hÉireann. Erected in proud and loving memory of all those from St Mary’s parish, Newry who have fought for Irish freeedom. Ar dheis Dé go raibh a n-anamacha. Pobal pharóiste N. Muire a thóg an leacht cuimhneacháin seo.” Pike-men are used on the base as a generic symbol of Irish nationalism, rather than mention of any particular group. In later years, stones to the Signatories and the hunger strikers will be added, along with graveside volunteers in modern garb.

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

Óglaigh Na hÉireann Iúr Cinn Trá

“Óglaigh na hÉireann Iúr Cinn Trá [Newry] i gcuimhne na n-Óglaigh a throid agus a fuair bás [who fought and died] ar son saoirse na hÉireann”. National Graves Association headstone over the republican plot in St Mary’s cemetery. Old Warrenpoint Road, Newry.

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

John Mitchel

“John Mitchel 1815 – 1875 After twenty years in exile for the sake of Ireland he returned with honour to die among his own people and he rests with his parents in the 1st Presbyterian old meeting house green at Newry.” Mitchel graduated from Trinity at 19 and became an attorney in Newry and Banbridge before becoming a writer and editor for The Nation (the phrase “England’s difficulty is Ireland’s opportunity” comes from an 1845 article) and then The United Irishman. After 16 editions, he was arrested and convicted of treason and sent to penal colonies in Bermuda and Tasmania. He escaped to the USA, where he was an ardent supporter of slavery. When slavery was abolished, he again took up the cause of Ireland, returned to Ireland, won the Westminster seat for Tipperary but was barred, as a felon, from taking it, and died unexpectedly at age 59 (WP).

John Mitchel Place, Newry.

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

Newry IRA

Monument in Newry’s Derrybeg estate. The central panels are to (left) the “1916 Easter Rising leader’s [sic] executed by the British government” and (right) Newry IRA volunteers Patrick Hughes, Edward Grant, Michael Hughes, Brendan Watters, and Colum Marks.

Second Avenue, Newry

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

The Unsung Heroes

“In proud and loving memory of all local volunteers, prisoners of war, republican activists and the unsung heroes who died of natural causes having served the cause of Irish republicanism [“sean óglach” on the individual plaques]. Together in unity you formed a bond which gave true meaning to the undefeated risen people. Your deeds of bravery and resistance will never be forgotten by the people of greater St. James’s. In your honour the quest for Irish freedom continues.” With the famous “our steps will be onward” quote from Máire Drumm at an anti-internment rally in Dunville Park on 10th August, 1975 (RN). Coiste Cuimhneacháin Lár Na bhFál/Ard Na bhFeá [Memorial committee of mid-Falls/Beechmount].

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

UVF South Belfast 2nd Battalion

“In proud memory of our fallen comrades from the officers and members of South Belafst 2nd Battalion [‘A’ Company Donegall Pass] ‘Glorious on the graves of heroes, kindly upon all those who have suffered for the cause. Thus will shine the dawn. They gave their tomorrow for our today.'” UVF memorial garden in Walnut Street.

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney

The Roddy McCorley Society

Images from the grounds of The Roddys club, Glen Road, Belfast, with memorials to McCorley (“In memory of Rody McCorley who was hanged here for his part in the rising of 1798 ‘The dead who died for Ireland, let not their memory die””), the deceased 1981 hunger strikers, the earlire 20th century hunger strikers (Thomas Ashe, Michael Fitzgerald, Terence MacSwiney, Joseph Murphy, Joseph Whitty, Denis Bary, Andrew Sullivan, Tony D’Arcy, Jack McNeela, Sean McCaughey, Michael Gaughan, Frank Stagg), Lenadoon deaths (Tony Henderson, Tony Jordan, John Finucane, Laura Crawford, Brendan O’Callaghan, Joe McDonnell, Mairead Farrell, Bridie Quinn, Patricia Black), Billy ‘Red’ Higgins founder member/president of the club, IRA volunteers from Lenadoon, “to the Irish men and Irish women who gave their lives in the rebellion of 1798”. Roddy McCorley, a Protestant member of the United Irishmen, is best known by the song written about his hanging at the bridge of Toome in 1800. (Here’s a version by Tommy Makem.)

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Copyright © 2010 Peter Moloney